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Recipe from Beth Hillson
Makes 20 to 22 cookies

These shortbread cookies dipped in chocolate make for delightful treats and great holiday gifts. They look just like the Keebler Cookies but taste even better! I used RYZE Blue Flour Blend in place of my own blend. I discovered that this blend makes fabulous cookies – better than any other flour blend I’ve tried. So, maybe I’ve given away Keebler’s trade secret (not), but this little discovery about RYZE is just between us gluten free bakers. If you prefer, omit the chocolate step and use this recipe for cutout holiday cookies.

2 cups RYZE Blue Flour Blend
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup butter, at room temperature
3/4 cup powdered sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
16 ounces chocolate chips, melted*

For the Cookies:
Preheat oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine RYZE flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

Beat butter and sugar on medium speed until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add vanilla and beat to combine.

On low speed, slowly add flour mixture, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl until a soft dough forms.

Turn dough onto a sheet of plastic wrap. Cover with a second sheet of plastic wrap and roll to 1/4-inch thickness.

Use a 2 ½ inch biscuit or other circle cutter to cut out cookies. Use a ¼ to ½ inch circle to cut out the centers. Gather the extra dough from around the sides of the cutouts. Slide the piece of plastic with the cut out cookies onto a cutting board or the back of a baking sheet and refrigerate for 15 minutes so the cookies can be lifted without tearing.

Place cookies on prepared baking sheets, 2 inches apart. Bake for 10-12 minutes until edges are just barely golden brown.

Let cookies cool on sheets for 5 minutes before removing to wire rack to cool completely.

Gather remnants of dough into a ball, roll out and cut into more circles as above.

To make the Fudge Stripes and Bottoms:

Spread wax paper on your countertop. Dip bottoms of cookies in melted chocolate, allowing excess to drip off before placing on wax paper.

Once all of the cookies have been coated in chocolate on one side, transfer the remaining chocolate to a small pastry bag fitted with a small, plain tip or a plastic baggie with a hole snipped off one corner.

Drizzle each cookie with stripes. Let chocolate firm up before serving cookies.

*Here’s a tip for melting the chocolate: Melt ¾ of the chocolate in a large heat-proof bowl over boiling water. Remove from the heat and add 1 to 2 teaspoons of the hot water (or more) until chocolate is smooth but not too thin. Add remaining chocolate to melted chocolate and stir until smooth. Add more boiling water if necessary.

Recipe From Beth Hillson
Makes one 9-inch springform pie or two 9-inch pies

What’s easy as pie and three times more decadent?  How about a Cherry Chocolate Hot Fudge Sundae Pie nestled in a chocolate macaroon crust? I drool just thinking about this incredible treat.  Besides, the preparation is quick.  Just assemble and freeze until about 20 minutes before serving.  Your guests will be impressed!

I’ve made this as a dairy-free ice cream pie (yup, dairy-free) by using Coconut Bliss Cherry Amaretto Frozen Dessert.  However, I’ve also made it with Ben & Jerry’s Cherry Garcia ice cream or frozen yogurt.  The results are always amazing. Perfect for all the summer picnics at hand or make this for a festive winter party, too.  Cut the crust into biscuit-size circles and layer with ice cream and hot fudge sauce in pretty glasses, too.

Macaroon Crust  Cherry Hot Fudge Ice Cream Pie log_edited-1

1 tablespoon safflower or coconut oil
1/3 cup chocolate chips, melted
3 1/4 cups unsweetened, shredded coconut
1/3 cup sugar
2 large egg whites
1/4 teaspoon salt

To Make the Crust

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. In a microwavable bowl, combine oil and chocolate chips.  Microwave on medium power for 30 second intervals until chips are just melted.  Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the coconut, sugar, egg whites, and salt, mixing until all of the coconut is moistened. Fold in the melted chocolate mixture.  Press the mixture into a 9-inch springform pan pressing evenly over the bottom of the pan and up the sides.  Alternatively, press into the bottom of 2, 9-inch pie pans. Place the pan (s) on a baking sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes, or until golden and slightly crispy. Let cool completely.

To Make the Filling

2 pints Coconut Bliss Cherry Amaretto Frozen Dessert or use your favorite ice cream
Gluten-free hot chocolate fudge sauce, warmed or Hershey’s Chocolate Sauce
Pitted dark cherries, frozen or fresh, for topping

While preparing the crust, set the ice cream on the counter to soften slightly.  Spread one pint of ice cream over the cooled crust.  Smooth the top. Spread the second pint over the first layer. Spread evenly on top. (You may not need all of the second pint.)  Freeze until the ice cream is totally frozen, about 4 to 6 hours or overnight. Right before serving, drizzle with warm hot fudge sauce.  Top with cherries, if desired.

To slice, let sit at room temperature for a few minutes.  Use a large knife dipped in warm water to cut the slices. Serve immediately with extra chocolate fudge sauce and cherries.

 

From Beth Hillson
Makes 1 loaf (14 servings)rasp banana choc bread

Could anything be better than having three favorite flavors packed into one recipe?  In this loaf, raspberries, banana and chocolate blend together to make a slightly sweet loaf that is as pretty as it is delicious.  Leftovers can be sliced and frozen.  Thaw and reheat in a 350 degree oven for 10 minutes.

2 cups Beth’s Gluten-Free Quick Bread Flour Blend + 1 tablespoon (next)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup granulated white sugar
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 large eggs
1 1/4 cups mashed ripe banana (about 3 medium bananas)
1/3 cup plain low fat yogurt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup dark or semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup halved raspberries

Additional raspberries and chocolate chips for topping, optional

Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 9×5-inch loaf pan with cooking spray. In a medium bowl, whisk together the 2 cups of flour blend and baking soda.

In a separate large bowl, beat the sugar and butter with an electric mixer at medium speed until well blended (about 1 minute). Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the banana, yogurt, and vanilla; beat until blended. Stir in the flour mixture.  Mix just until moist.  Fold in the chocolate chips.  Gently toss the raspberries with the remaining 1 tablespoon of flour blend and fold into batter.

Spoon the batter into the prepared pan. Top with a few additional chocolate chips and raspberries, if desired.

Bake for 60 to 65 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean and the top feels firm to the touch.

Cool 15 minutes in the pan on a wire rack. Remove from pan and cool completely on the wire rack.

Beth’s Gluten-Free Quick Bread Flour Blend

Several flours are interchangeable in this flour blend.  You’ll see them noted here.  I prefer using cornstarch as it produces a lighter quick bread loaf. However, potato starch produces a chewier texture in the beer bread.  Take your pick according to preference and food sensitivities.

Combine these ingredients.  Blend well, then scoop out the amount needed for your recipe.

1 cup sorghum flour (or corn or brown rice flour)
¾ cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour)
¾ cup cornstarch (or potato starch or tapioca starch flour)
½ cup amaranth flour (or quinoa, buckwheat, or millet flour)
2 ½ teaspoons xanthan gum
1 ¼  teaspoons salt

From Beth Hillson

The best thing about quick breads is suggested in the name.  With no yeast to coax into rising and no long waits or kneading, quick breads reach lofty limits via fast-acting baking powder or baking soda or both.  Once liquids and leavening touch, the action begins; quick bread goes right into the oven to maximize the chemical reaction that is beginning. Best yet, quick breads can be enjoyed by those who are gluten free and yeast free and miss their bread.  Owing to the light texture and sumptuous flavor of this bread, no one misses out!

Honey Beer Breadbeer bread for blog

Makes 1 loaf (14 servings)

This recipe produces a light and moist loaf.  You can replace the beer with an equal amount of seltzer water to turn this into a wonderful, yeast-free sandwich bread.

3 cups Beth’s Gluten-Free Quick Bread Flour Blend (next)
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 tablespoon white sugar, optional
3 large eggs at room temperature
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons honey
1 1/3 cups gluten-free beer or seltzer water at room temperature
2 teaspoons melted butter or dairy-free buttery spread for topping

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Grease a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan.

Mix flour blend, baking powder, and sugar, if used, together in a bowl.

Beat eggs, olive oil, and honey together in a separate large bowl; add flour mixture and beat with an electric mixer until you get a smooth batter. Stir beer into the batter and beat batter until smooth.  Transfer to prepared loaf pan. Brush the top of the loaf with melted butter.

Bake in preheated oven until cake tester comes out clean, about 45 to 50 minutes.

Cool in pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes.  Turn bread out onto wire rack to cool completely before slicing.

Beth’s Gluten-Free Quick Bread Flour Blend

Several flours are interchangeable in a flour blend.  You’ll see them noted here.  I prefer using cornstarch as it produces a lighter quick bread loaf. However, potato starch produces a chewier texture in the beer bread.  Take your pick according to preference and food sensitivities.

Combine these ingredients.  Blend well, then scoop out the amount needed for your recipe.

1 cup sorghum flour (or corn or brown rice flour)
¾ cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour)
¾ cup cornstarch (or potato starch or tapioca starch flour)
½ cup amaranth flour (or quinoa, buckwheat, or millet flour)
2 ½ teaspoons xanthan gum
1 ¼  teaspoons salt

 

I am grateful for good, gluten-free pizza and this one tops my list.  It’s chewy, thanks to the addition of millet flour, and flavorful, thanks to the use of high protein flours.  You can use any blend that contains one or more of these flours.   (Chickpea, teff, and sorghum are all good.)  Of course, you have to make this yourself, but it’s not difficult and these pizzas (par-baked or fully baked) can be frozen.

Using a pizza stone enhances the texture and fills the crust with a slightly smoky flavor.  It’s yumminess to the 10th power.   But, if you don’t have a stone, don’t fret.  Use a heavy baking sheet or pizza pan and set it on the lowest rack in the oven.

The recipe is versatile, too.  Use the dough to make pizza, pizza pockets, and focaccia.  No need to let the dough rise.  It will puff up nicely in the oven.  However, if you like a thicker crust, let it rise for 10 minutes before adding toppings and bake an addition 3 to 4 minutes.   I’ve suggested some of my favorite toppings.  However, feel free to use whatever suits your fancy.

The Dough
Makes 2, 12-inch pizzas

2 ½ cups high protein blend of choice or my recipe, below
½ cup millet flour
1 tablespoon xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons chopped dry or 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
5 teaspoons instant active dry yeast
1 1/3 cups warm water
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon cider vinegar

Place the pizza stone on the lowest rack of the oven and preheat the oven to 450 degrees.  (Do this 30 to 60 minutes ahead so the stone is very hot.)  If you are not using a stone, it is not necessary to preheat the oven for an extended amount of time.

In the bowl of a heavy duty mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the
high protein blend, millet flour, xanthan gum, salt, and rosemary.  Blend well.  Add the yeast and blend.  Combine water, oil, honey, and vinegar.  Beat at medium high speed for 3 to 5 minutes or until the dough thickens.  Follow preparation instructions below.

Gourmet Toppings For One Pizza
Makes 1, 12-inch pizza

1 to 2 teaspoons good quality olive oil
2 tablespoons good quality pizza sauce (such as Muir Glen)
4 medium tomatoes (red, yellow and orange) thickly sliced
A handful of small, pitted cured black olives such as Nicoise
¼ cup cubed Manchego or other cheese (optional)
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Fresh rosemary for garnish

Preparation

Scoop half the dough onto a lightly oiled sheet of parchment paper.  Cover with a sheet of lightly oiled plastic wrap.  Use finger tips and palm to lightly press the dough into a 12-inch circle.  Use finger tips to create a rim of dough around the edge that will become a pretty crust.  Drizzle olive oil of the surface and top with a light coating of pizza sauce.  Scatter tomato slices, olives and cheese over the sauce.  Sprinkle with freshly grated Parmesan.

Slide onto pizza paddle and transfer to the preheated stone, sliding the parchment off the paddle and onto the stone or slide parchment onto a baking sheet and set in the lowest rack of the preheated oven.  Bake 20 to 24 minutes depending on the thickness.  The bottom of the pizza will be brown.  Slide the pizza paddle under the parchment and slide the pizza out of the oven.  Don’t worry if the paper tears a little.  Sprinkle with fresh rosemary and serve.

Note:  Double ingredients and repeat with remaining dough or prepare the crust and par-bake for 12 minutes (without toppings).  Store the crust in the freezer for a later use.  Thaw before adding toppings.

High Protein Blend  (from Gluten-Free Makeovers)
Blend well and scoop out 2 ½ cups for the pizza recipe above.  Reserve the rest for later use.

1¼ cups white or brown rice flour
1¼ cups sweet white sorghum flour
½ cup amaranth flour
¾ cup cornstarch or tapioca starch

As with so many great recipes, this one passed through several channels, but rather than the old-fashioned grandmother to mother to daughter or son kind of hand-me-down, this one went through an internet-compressed timeline.  One day, I read an account from Mark Bittman in the New York Times Magazine about his friend Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s squash on toast.  It was not a recipe, per se, but an account, like someone passing along the gist of a recipe, the flavor, the texture, but never the amounts.

The mention of winter squash and caramelized onions caught my attention.  What great flavors and there was nothing unhealthy or fattening, at least in the description.  So I created a recipe from what I thought Jean-Georges might have told Mark and that Mark was recounting to his readers.  I made the recipe for a Thanksgiving appetizer and served it with gluten-free French bread. Needless to say, it was a huge hit.  Even my son wanted the recipe.

So, I figured I would copy the account from the New York Times online and fill in the details with my notes.  But what came up was the original recipe from Jean-Georges Vongerichten.  In some places, it was quite different than what I had created.  It called for cheese, chili flakes, and mint.  By then, I was hooked on my version.  Here it is, a perfect dip or spread or appetizer that I’ll be serving at all our winter gatherings, especially for the Super Bowl.

Butternut Squash Spread 
1 medium butternut squash, peeled and cubed
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
2 large yellow onions, peeled and thinly sliced
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons maple syrup
Gluten-free baguette, thinly sliced and lightly toasted
Extra salt, to taste

Heat the oven to 400.  Toss the squash cubes with 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1 teaspoon of salt and spread the mixture over a parchment-lined baking sheet.  Bake, stirring every few minutes, until tender and slightly colored, about 20 to 25 minutes.  Edges should be  golden brown and squash should be very tender.  Remove from the oven.

Meanwhile, heat remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium-high heat, add the onions and remaining teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the onions are well softened and darkening, at least 15 minutes. Add the vinegar and syrup, stir and reduce until broken down, an additional 15 minutes or so. The mixture should be jammy.

Combine squash and onions in a bowl and smash with a fork until combined. Adjust seasoning.  Serve with gluten-free toast or crackers.

Note:  The original recipe says to spread this mixture on toasted bread, top with ricotta, goat cheese or mascarpone cheese, coarse salt and mint.  I did not do this, but now that I’m passing this on, you can try your own version of this wonderful recipe!

Christine from New Zealand wrote to say, “I haven’t had a Crumpet for years and wondered if you had a recipe for gluten free crumpets?”

She piqued my interest as I had never had one.  So I did a bit of research.  Crumpets are made with a rather thin yeast batter and are cooked on a bake stone or griddle in crumpet or English muffin rings.  The distinguishing feature of real crumpets is their pliable texture and the characteristic holes into which butter deliciously melts and oozes.

After reading a mainstream formula, I developed this recipe makeover.  These crumpets are soft,  light in texture and quite tasty.  You will not be disappointed.  Add your favorite jam or slather with butter.  I like both.  If you are not able to get one of the all-purpose flour blends I mentioned here, you can use any flour blend you have available.

Crumpets  by Beth Hillson 
This recipe makes 8 to 10 crumpets.

1 ½ cups all-purpose gluten-free flour blend such as Gluten-Free Pantry All-Purpose Flour or King Arthur Multi-Purpose Flour
½ cup sorghum flour
2 ¼ teaspoons dry active yeast
1 teaspoon of sugar
½ teaspoon cream of tartar
¾ cup warm milk  (about 110 degrees)
½ cup warm water (about 110 degrees)
1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon melted butter

TIP:  If using a blend that does not contain gum and salt, add 1 teaspoon xanthan gum and ½ teaspoon salt.

1) Combine flours, yeast, sugar, cream of tartar and blend.  Add warm milk and water and beat for 3 minutes.   Cover with plastic wrap and let stand in a warm place for about 20 minutes. The thick batter should double in size.

2) Add baking powder, baking soda and butter and beat for 1 minute or until well mixed.  Cover and let stand 10 minutes.

3) Preheat a griddle to 350 degrees.  Coat 8 to 10, 3 ½ inch English muffin rings well with vegetable spray.   Set on griddle, bake stone or large skillet (see note below).

4) Place enough mixture into the center of each ring to come halfway to the top of the ring.  Cook for 4-6 minutes over medium heat, until bubbles appear over the entire surface, and the dough appears ‘dry’.

5) Use tongs to remove the ring.  Turn the crumpet over and cook an additional 2 to 4 minutes to brown the top. Remove from the pan and cool on a baking rack. Split and enjoy.  Or, if thin enough, do not split before eating.

Notes:  Alternatively, make thinner crumpets by filling only one-third of the way up the rings.  These do not need to be cooked on the second side.  If you don’t have a griddle, heat a heavy cast iron skillet and line it with as many rings as possible.  You’ll need to make these in more than one batch.

In celebration of reaching 1,500 “Likes” on Facebook, I am sharing this collections of holiday recipes with all of you.  Here’s to a happy, healthy, and tasty holiday season!

Holiday E Book for Facebook

 

Pear Coffee Cake

As a baker, I am reluctant to let go of certain sacrosacnt ingredients.  Eggs is one of those precious commodities.  Then a colleague who is gluten and egg-free asked me if I could convert a coffee cake recipe so she could enjoy, too.  I recalled that, back in the days when I owned the Gluten-Free Pantry, I had made many recipes where I replaced eggs with silken tofu,  flax gel (1 tablespoon flax meal with 3 tablespoons of hot water) or even with applesauce.  I dug out my favorite coffee cake recipe, already gluten-free, and went to work. The results were delicious.

This stunning coffee cake uses soy (or coconut) yogurt and pear puree.  The yogurt adds back some of the protein from the eggs and the pear puree, like applesauce, contains pectin which tenderizes the cake.  I added a little bit more baking powder to help it rise, usually another job done by the eggs.   

This is comfort food at its best and begs for a cup of coffee or tea.  I also like to make this with apples and applesauce.

1 cup sugar
1 ½  cups All-purpose Gluten-Free Flour Blend
½ cup sorghum flour
2 teaspoons xanthan gum*
½ teaspoon salt*
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1½ cups soy or coconut yogurt (flavored yogurt works well)
6 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 tablespoons pureed baby pear puree or unsweetened applesauce
½ cup peeled and chopped ripe Bartlett, Bosc or red pears, or diced canned pears
Crumble Topping (below)

Preheat the oven to 325°F and lightly oil a 9-inch springform pan.

Combine the sugar, flour blend, sorghum flour, xanthan gum, salt, baking powder, and baking soda in a large bowl. Set aside.

Combine the yogurt, vegetable oil, and pear puree in a mixing bowl and beat until smooth. Add the dry ingredients and beat until smooth.  Fold in chopped fruit.

Spoon half the batter over the bottom of the prepared pan and smooth to the edges of the pan.  Cover with half of the crumb mixture. Spoon the remaining batter over the crumb topping and smooth to the edges. Sprinkle the remaining topping over the top.

Bake 50 to 55 minutes, until cake tester comes out clean and center springs back when gently touched.

Cool 10 minutes in the pan. Remove the rim of the pan and cool completely on a wire rack. Serve.

*If your all-purpose blend contains salt and gum, omit the salt and reduce the gum to ½ teaspoon.

Crumble Topping
½ cup rice flour
½ cup packed brown sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon ground allspice
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
¼ teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons unsalted butter or non-dairy buttery spread, at room temperature

Combine the flour, brown sugar, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, and salt in a large bowl. Mix well. Add the butter and use fingertips or a fork to mix just until crumbly.

This can be made ahead and stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

I envy Northern California for its long growing season, its verdant farms and endless vineyards. But from June to September, Connecticut is in full bloom and I am content to stay close to home, near the local orchards and farms that rival anything I’ve seen in any other part of the US. Our best chefs know that cooking with fresh, local foods can turn ordinary recipes into three-star meals.  I’m reminded of that secret when Connecticut’s harvest smiles.  I load up on fresh corn, heirloom tomatoes, zucchini, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and herbs.  I can never have enough!

And just about now, the orchards are bearing fruit – – pears, apples, and peaches.  Ah.  Peaches.  Perhaps my favorite of all the local produce.  Nothing else comes close to that juicy, tree-ripened crop.   Their faint fruit perfume floats over the back roads as I drive by the local orchards.  I buy them by the bushelful.  By the time I get home, I’ve devoured a sizable number and my car seat and steering wheel bear the sticky evidence.  It’s a race to reach my saturation point before the trees return to their dormant state.  So I eat just as many as I possibly can.  But I reserve enough to bake a few special treats.

This peach cake is one. Fresh peach slices, fanned out over the buttery cake, turn this into an elegant dessert that bursts with intense flavor. The cake makes the perfect company dessert that fools most into thinking it’s not gluten-free.  Perhaps that’s because I started with a great, gluten-filled recipe.  This is a makeover from one I saw in Bon Appetit several years ago.  It can also be packed and taken to a picnic or a pot luck meal. Don’t tell, but I make this with frozen peaches when the fresh varieties are not available. They beat the hard, unripened fruit that I find in stores throughout the rest of the year. I’ve also used fresh plums. The purple skin makes for an equally beautiful presentation.

PEACH CAKE

3/4 cup all-purpose gluten-free flour blend *
½ cup sorghum Flour
1½ teaspoons baking powder
½  teaspoon xanthan gum
¾ cup plus 3 tablespoons sugar, divided
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter or non-dairy buttery spread, at room temperature
1½ teaspoons finely grated orange zest
2 large eggs or egg replacer of choice
1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
4 ripe, but firm peaches halved and each half cut into 4 slices*
¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon for topping
Whipped cream or whipped dairy-free topping

Second Choice:  Cascadian Farms or other brand Organic sliced peaches can be used.  Thaw fruit before using.  Purchase 2, 10-ounce bags and pick the prettiest slices for this cake.  Save the rest for another use.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly oil a 9-inch spring form pan. Combine the flour blend, sorghum flour, baking powder, and xanthan gum in a bowl; set aside.

Beat ¾ cup of the sugar and butter in a mixing bowl until fluffy.  Add the dry ingredients and orange zest and beat until crumbly. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition. Add the orange juice and beat just to incorporate. Spread the batter evenly in the prepared pan.

Arrange the peach slices on top of the batter so that they touch and form concentric circles that cover the batter. Press into the batter lightly. Don’t worry if the slices are not perfect. The cake will partially cover the fruit as it bakes. Combine the remaining 3 tablespoons sugar and the cinnamon and sprinkle over the batter.

Bake 55 to 60 minutes, until golden and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Run a knife along the side of the pan to release and remove the side of the pan. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature with whipped cream or dairy-free topping.

*  If  the blend you use does not contain salt and gum, add ½ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon additional xanthan gum to the dry ingredients.