Monthly Archives: August 2016

Recipe By Beth Hillson

Makes 1 Boulefinished boule with no knead dough

 No-Knead Bread seems like an oxymoron to me.  Aren’t we all looking for a texture that allows us to touch and knead our gluten free dough?  Although you actually can knead the dough in this recipe, it’s not necessary.

This bread is a makeover from the wildly popular no-knead wheat loaf that’s based on a recipe published in the New York Times courtesy of Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery fame. I know a number of bread bakers who make this regularly.  It’s beautiful, tastes terrific, requires no special ingredients and, best of all, it takes virtually no effort to produce a perfect loaf.

When no-knead bread became the rage a couple of years ago for people who bake with wheat flour, it caught my attention. Its popularity was based on an easy prep: Mix it up in a bowl, let it rest on the counter up to 18 hours and stick it in the oven. Voila! Homemade bread.

I used my makeover magic to create this great-tasting, gorgeous loaf, the gluten-free version of Jim Lahey’s recipe.  I used flax meal so the structure benefitted from eggs but could rest on the counter overnight. In place of wheat flour, I used a blend of gluten-free flours, starches and xanthan gum.

The amount of water was the tricky part.  Too much water made the dough clay-like in texture and produced a hard rather than crusty exterior. Too little resulted in a dry, crumby loaf.

The original recipe called for a tiny bit of yeast. That might work with wheat dough but didn’t produce enough lift for dense, gluten-free dough. I increased the amount of yeast to create a steady fermentation process and a subtle sourdough taste. My loaf did not benefit from a lengthy resting period.  The original recipe suggests 18 hours.  This dough seems best if you let is rest 8 to 12 hours or overnight.

If you have a Dutch oven, I recommend using it. This produces just enough steam to create a chewy crust.  Otherwise, set the boule on a baking stone or baking sheet to bake.

I’ve doubled the recipe and pulled off dough for rolls and breadsticks, too.  It’s pretty cool dough and very easy to make.

Note:  A version of this recipe appears in the Oct/Nov 2016 issue of Gluten Free & More Magazine.

My Makeover of No-Knead Bread

2 tablespoons flax meal
6 tablespoons hot water
1 ½ cups sorghum flour
¾ cup potato starch
½ cup sweet rice flour
¼ cup tapioca starch flour
2 ½ teaspoons xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons yeast
1 cup warm water, divided, more as needed
2 tablespoons honey 

In a medium bowl, combine flax meal with hot water and let sit until thick, about 5 minutes.  Meanwhile, mix together sorghum flour, potato starch, sweet rice flour, tapioca starch flour, xanthan gum and salt.  Set aside.

Stir yeast, ½ cup warm water and honey into flax gel.  Let sit for 15 minutes or until mixture becomes foamy.

Stir mixture into dry ingredients.  Add remaining ½ cup warm water, 2 tablespoons at a time, until mixture is smooth and silky to touch but not sticky.  It may take the full ½ cup of water.  If mixture has dry spots, add 1 tablespoon additional warm water.  Dough will be shaggy (not smooth) at this point. 

Set in a bowl.  Cover with plastic wrap and let the dough sit in a warm spot on the counter for 8 hours or overnight.  It should rise, but won’t double in size.  As the dough sits, it will give off moisture that will soften the texture.

Coat a sheet of parchment paper with oil.  Set the dough on parchment and roll it to coat in the oil.  Smooth into a ball.  Set it in a 4-quart Dutch oven, cover with the lid and let it rise 1 hour. 

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.  After 1 hour, remove the lid and score the top with a sharp knife.  Brush with oil or egg wash, if desired.  (This will cause the crust to brown.) 

Cover and bake for 30 minutes.  Remove the lid and bake another 20 to 30 minutes.

Cool completely before cutting.

Recipe From Beth Hillson

Makes 9 to 12 Pattieschickpea quinoa patties

Here’s a delicious way to enjoy leftover quinoa. Chickpeas and sweet potato boost the nutritional profile and add flavor and texture. Enjoy these for lunch, dinner or a wholesome snack. You can also serve these on gluten-free rolls or hamburger buns and garnish with lettuce and tomato slices.

Patties will keep 3 to 5 days in the refrigerator. Red Pepper Mayonnaise can be made ahead and stored in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

1 cup cooked black and white quinoa
1 cup sweet potato puree or pumpkin puree
1 cup chickpeas, rinsed, drained and mashed
2 teaspoons crushed garlic
2 teaspoons crushed ginger
¼ cup quinoa flour
4 scallions, green part removed, white part chopped
2 large eggs
Salt and pepper, to taste
1-1½ cups gluten-free panko crumbs
1 tablespoon olive oil, more as needed
Red Pepper Mayonnaise (Below)

To make the patties, place quinoa, sweet potato puree, mashed chickpeas, garlic, ginger, quinoa flour, chopped scallions, eggs, salt and pepper in a bowl. Mix together until well combined.

Spread panko crumbs over a medium plate.

Scoop out a heaping 1/4 cup of quinoa mixture and pat into a patty about 3 to 4 inches in diameter. Dredge in panko crumbs on both sides. Repeat with remaining quinoa mixture.

Place olive oil in a heavy skillet and heat over medium heat. Sauté patties in olive oil, about 2 minutes a side. Remove from pan and let cool. (Patties can be refrigerated at this point and baked later.)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.

Set patties on prepared baking sheet in a single layer. Place in preheated oven and bake 10 minutes. Serve warm with Red Pepper Mayonnaise.

Red Pepper Mayonnaise

Makes 1¼ cups

¾ cup packed jarred roasted red peppers, without liquid
½ cup lite mayonnaise
1 tablespoon honey
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional

Place roasted red peppers, mayonnaise, honey and cayenne pepper (if using) in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the blade. Blend until smooth.

Recipe by Beth Hillson
Serves 6

Gluten-Free whole-grain sorghum is a newcomer to our great grain choices.  A powerhouse of nutrients, vitamins and fiber, sorghum is rich in B vitamins and minerals, it promotes digestion, lowers blood sugar levels and reduces cholesterol. Whole-grain sorghum takes an hour to cook. Pearled sorghum contains fewer nutrients and less fiber but cooks in less time (about 40 minutes). Either way, prepare sorghum a day ahead and refrigerated until ready to use. Add delicious veggies like corn, tomatoes and kale and you’ve got a full meal.   

This recipe is part of my Healthy Plate Project, a wellness program to make life healthier one meal at a time.

sorghum bowl with corn and tomatoes

3 cups water
1 cup uncooked sorghum or pearled sorghum
½ teaspoon salt
6 teaspoons olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh tarragon
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar, optional
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons crushed garlic
½ teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2-3 cups lightly sautéed chopped kale or baby kale
2 cups halved cherry tomatoes
1 ½ cups fresh corn kernels* 

Combine water, sorghum, and ½ teaspoon salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil; cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer 1 hour or until. tender. Drain; cool.

Combine olive oil, tarragon, vinegar, mustard, garlic, salt, and pepper in a large bowl.  Whisk well . Add cooked sorghum, kale, tomatoes, and corn kernels; toss.

*Grill corn on the cob.  Cool and scrape the kernels off the cob.  

Recipe from Beth Hillson

 Kale has been the darling of the super food movement for several years.  High in nutrients and fiber, filling and versatile, kale is one of my favorites, too.  This year, we planted kale in the garden.  The plants produce delicate leaves that are not woody like some of the more mature kale you buy in supermarkets.  However, you’ll want to make this year round so buy the mature stalks in the produce section and trim the woody stems from the leaves before preparing.  It’s best if you can buy organic kale.  The convention version is one of the Dirty Dozen, meaning it is a sponge for pesticides. 

This recipe is part of my Healthy Plate Project, a wellness program to make life healthier one meal at a time. 

Check out my crop of homegrown kale.   kale gardenThe Salad
Serves 6

3 red or golden beets, peeled and cubed
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Sea salt, as needed
2 bunches curly kale (about 10 cups)
3 peaches, cut in slices or frozen peach slices, thawed
2 large plum tomatoes, cut into slices from top to bottom
6 – 8 ounces feta or goat cheese
1/3 cup pistachios kale and roasted beet salad

The Dressing
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
Sea salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Line two pans with aluminum foil or parchment paper.  On one baking sheet, toss the beets with 1 tablespoon olive oil and salt and roast for 20- 25 minutes.  Remove and cool.

Lower oven temperature to 350 degrees.  On the other baking sheet, toss the peaches and tomatoes with 1 tablespoon oil and salt.  Bake 20 minutes.  Remove and cool. 

Cut and stem the kale.  Toss the pieces with olive oil and salt and spread over cookie sheet.  Bake until crisp, about 15 minutes. 

Make the dressing:  Whisk together all of the ingredients. 

Gently mix together the roasted beets, kale, peaches and tomatoes.  Toss with feta cheese and the dressing.  Top with nuts and serve.